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[«] Posts by the Author "Stephen Keating"(#375)

February 21 2018, 1PM

Last semester I had an inordinate number of instances of plagiarism. The majority of them came on papers that were almost wholly personal reflection, so I was really troubled by what had led to this occurrence. There’s no doubt that high schools (pr... [blog posts] [teaching]

February 14, 5PM

Thank god the US media finally has the attention span required to pursue a Trump scandal for more than 24 hours. I’ve seen people on twitter lamenting the fact that the president sleeping with and then paying off a porn star got less coverage than a... [blog posts] [politics of the absurd]

February 6, 12 PM

Marika inspired me to post my syllabus for the semester: Understanding Religion. This is my second semester teaching introductory religion courses at Montclair State University, and I’m much happier with this syllabus than the one I put together for... [syllabi]

December 29 2017, 8PM

Hello fellow legacy media users, I’m at home procrastinating on finishing my syllabus for Intro to Religion for the Spring, so let’s chat TV. I won’t pretend to be a critic or anything and list out 10 shows, but here are my favorites fro... [blog posts] [TV]

May 2, 7AM

My thanks to everyone who participated in the book event. This has been a fun and varied conversation about Adam’s excellent book. In case you missed it, Adam has responded to each post in the comments sections. The Anselm discussion below Linn To... [Prince of This World Book Event]

April 28, 11AM

This response in our book event on Adam’s The Prince of This World is by Dotan Leshem, senior lecturer in the School of Political Science at the University of Haifa. The Prince of the World is a very ambitious and most welcome book. It offers an importa... [Prince of This World Book Event]

April 19, 7AM

This response in our book event on Adam’s The Prince of This World is by Linn Tonstad, Yale Divinity School.  Adam Kotsko’s The Prince of This World traces the subterranean logic by which the devil developed first as God’s opponent, then as God’... [Prince of This World Book Event]

April 17, 6AM

The first response in our book event on Adam’s The Prince of This World is by Bruce Rosenstock, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. I’m beginning to write my response to Adam Kotsko’s wonderful new book, The Prince of This World, in t... [blog posts] [Prince of This World Book Event]

April 11, 10AM

In a week we will be starting a book event on Adam’s latest, The Prince of This World. If you don’t yet have a copy, Stanford University Press has posted the introduction here. Digital and physical copies are available wherever fine books a... [Prince of This World Book Event]

May 5 2016, 9AM

It is no great insight to point towards Engel’s admiration of Darwin and his desire to place his and Marx’s theory in the vein of scientific advance: “Just as Darwin discovered the law of development of organic nature, so Marx discovered the law of ... [blog posts] [darwinism] [Marxism]

August 28 2015, 6AM

This is a guest post by Lisa Gasson-Gardner. Lisa is a PhD student at Drew University. She is writing about revelation, affect, and evangelical politics. I did not watch the August 6th GOP debates (though I cannot get over this video of Trump) but I did d... [Mary-Jane Rubenstein] [Worlds Without End Book Event]

August 21, 8AM

This introduction comes from Catherine Keller.  Mary Jane Rubenstein’s Worlds Without End: The Many Lives of the Multiverse There are many second books that this multigifted philosopher of religion might have written. Why this one? Mary-Jane Rubenstei... [Catherine Keller] [Mary-Jane Rubenstein] [Worlds Without End Book Event]

June 3, 7AM

This is a guest post from Asma Afsaruddin, Chair and Professor, Department of Near Eastern Languages and Cultures, Indiana University, Bloomington. With the term “caliphate” being bandied around so much lately, often in a negative vein, S. Sayyid’... [Recalling the Caliphate Book Event]

May 27, 5AM

Our event on S. Sayyid’s Recalling the Caliphate is kicking off on Friday and readers interested in an appetizer can find his review of Cotton, Climate, and Camels over at SCTIW. A small sample: The same conflict between ideology and knowledge... [Plato-to-NATO]

May 14, 9AM

In August we will be hosting a book event on Mary-Jane Rubenstein’s latest, Worlds Without End. …in which are discussed pre-, early-, and post-modern multiple-worlds cosmologies; the sundry arguments for and against them; the striking peculiarit... [blog posts]

April 4, 9AM

Foucault: There is also a sort of game that I play with this. I often quote concepts, texts and phrases from Marx, but without feeling obliged to add the authenticating label of a footnote with a laudatory phrase to accompany the quotation. As long as one... [Marx] [Marxism]

March 25, 4PM

In late May we will be hosting the next AUFS book event on S. Sayyid’s Recalling the Caliphate: Decolonisation and World Order (Amazon). Sayyid was formerly the Director of the International Centre of Muslim and Non-Muslim Understanding at the U... [Recalling the Caliphate Book Event]

February 9, 8AM

For An und Für Sich Sunday 2.8.15 Cloud Precipitates Let me announce, not without celebration, that this is my first time to participate in this sort of virtual book conversation. Thank you Stephen, for initiating this exchange on if not in the Cloud—... [Catherine Keller] [Cloud of the Impossible Book Event]

January 21, 7AM

This is a guest post from Catherine Tomas. She is finishing her Dphil in theology at Oxford University. Catherine Keller’s book opened up a multiplicity of thoughts for me. And ‘The multiplicities come attached systemically, perspectivally, with int... [Catherine Keller] [Cloud of the Impossible Book Event]

January 19, 7AM

This is guest post from Carolyn Roncolato. She holds a Ph.D. in Theology, Ethics, and the Human Sciences from Chicago Theological Seminary. In Cloud of the Impossible Catherine Keller asks, “How shall we think the relation between the nonseparability en... [Catherine Keller] [Cloud of the Impossible Book Event]

January 14, 7AM

Catherine Keller’s Cloud of the Impossible: Negative Theology and Planetary Entanglement is one of those rare books with a counter-intuitive thesis that, once one is looking for it, can be seen in unexpected places. Traditionally, negative theology has ... [Catherine Keller] [Cloud of the Impossible Book Event]

November 26 2014, 9AM

In Blood, Gil Anidjar, reflecting on the futility of writing a book (in this day and age!), appends a curious note: The sheer weight of accumulation, fifty shades of clay and mountains of waste (not to mention, horribile dictu, footnotes), among othe... [The lighter side of AUFS]

November 19, 11AM

Thinking critically about thinking about religion is fraught with misdirections. I’ve been reflecting on a post that Steven wrote last week highlighting the way that individuals are able to combine a ‘default cultural relativism’ with a ‘high leve... [religion] [secularism] [Talal Asad]

November 10, 7AM

We are excited to announce that our next book event will be on Catherine Keller’s Cloud of the Impossible, which is now available from Columbia University Press. Keller’s faculty page has links to her other work: Catherine Keller is Profes... [blog posts]

October 26, 7AM

The issues around Strachey’s Standard Edition of Freud’s works are much discussed–Besetzung being an exemplary case. It was rendered “cathexis.” This has several disadvantages, not least of which that most people have no idea w... [Freud] [translation]

October 16, 8AM

Though numbers have declined in recent years, millions of Americans still regularly participate in the high holy days of this religion. Traveling to their local house of worship, they partake in the sacrament that affirms their existence within a shadow... [politics of the absurd]

October 14, 9AM

In many of Gil Anidjar’s works there seems to be a common thread pertaining to what I might hesitatingly call “method.” His texts often take the form of investigations into the conditions for the possibility of X. Of course, the Kantia... [Gil Anidjar]

October 7, 11AM

Readers of the blog who live within range of Columbia University may be interested in this event tonight at Book Culture. I’ll be there, so say hi!Filed under: blog posts [blog posts]

September 19, 6AM

As I mentioned a few months ago, a couple of us are starting to read Freud’s Psychologie des Unbewußten (Amazon link) via Google Hangout. The plan is to do a close reading of the German and move somewhat slowly through the text. It will be either... [blog posts]

August 18, 12 AM

I would like to extend my gratitude to all the readers, commenters, and especially the contributors who have made this book event so generative. The wide range of responses is a testament to the text’s careful attention to the Christian process of d... [blog posts]

July 31, 6AM

I found this article by Gil Anidjar on Gaza from 2009. It’s worth taking a look at if you’re interested in seeing how he applies his work to the contemporary situation. Some of the arguments of Blood of previewed a bit. It’s on JSTOR he... [Gil Anidjar]

July 28, 9AM

And all the people said, “His blood shall be on us and on our children!” –Matthew 27:25 How to introduce a book that asks its readers to rethink the role of Western Christianity? The scope of Blood is massive. On its own terms, it must be, for b... [Blood A Critique of Christianity Book Event]

July 12, 8AM

I’m eager to undertake a reading project in order to consolidate my German skills and have decided upon Freud’s Psychologie des Unbewußten (Amazon link). There are two potential options for this reading group: Online via Google Hangouts (... [Freud]

June 23, 5AM

Most readers are probably already aware that Anthony has started a new podcast. If you’ve been waiting to subscribe, now is a good chance: his latest interviewee is Adam Kotsko. They cover a wide range of topics from Agamben to Zizek, pedagogy to su... [My Name Is My Name podcast]

May 29, 9AM

This is by Amaryah Shaye and was originally posted at Women In Theology. Amaryah will be contributing to our upcoming book event on Gil Anidjar’s Blood: A Critique of Christianity. In a recent Facebook discussion I got drawn into regarding Zize... [Zizek]
This is by Amaryah Shaye and was originally posted at Women In Theology. Amaryah will be contributing to our upcoming book event on Gil Anidjar’s Blood: A Critique of Christianity. In a recent Facebook discussion I got drawn into regarding Zize... [Zizek]

May 23, 12 PM

I’m currently working through a bunch of Maimonides’ texts for a paper that I’m writing and have been reminded how brilliant he is when taking shots at his opponents. In “Helek: Sanhedrin, Chapter Ten” he lists three pos... [Maimonides] [The lighter side of AUFS]
I’m currently working through a bunch of Maimonides’ texts for a paper that I’m writing and have been reminded how brilliant he is when taking shots at his opponents. In “Helek: Sanhedrin, Chapter Ten” he lists three pos... [Maimonides] [The lighter side of AUFS]

May 6, 12 PM

In Adam’s post from earlier today, he creating the fun, new category of the “left-curious” and identified those who loudly decry leftist autocannibalism as one warning sign for this particular ailment. My question is: what other warni... [politics of the absurd]

May 5, 7AM

Later this Summer, we will be hosting the next AUFS book event on Gil Anidjar’s Blood: A Critique of Christianity. We have been looking forward to this book and have put together an exciting group of contributors, most of whom are not regular AUF... [Blood A Critique of Christianity Book Event] [Books] [Gil Anidjar]

April 16, 11AM

Is the Exciting New Grad School an inherently anti-labor institution? First, as Adam has already pointed out, perhaps one reason for the apparent excitement for the Global Center for Advanced Studies is the hunger for an alternative to the increasingly ne... [Academia] [politics of the absurd]
Is the Exciting New Grad School an inherently anti-labor institution? First, as Adam has already pointed out, perhaps one reason for the apparent excitement for the Global Center for Advanced Studies is the hunger for an alternative to the increasingly ne... [Academia] [politics of the absurd]

February 19, 6AM

In class this semester I volunteered to give a presentation summarizing some key points from Derrida’s The Gift of Death for a group that had not read the book. It was fun to engage in a careful reading of this text after looking at interpretation... [derrida]

October 21 2013, 12 PM

Readers of the blog may be interested in this short, provocative piece by Yasmin Nair about Žižek, but perhaps more about particular receptions of Žižek and the way that those often play out along gendered lines. My larger point here is that Žižek... [blog posts]

August 20, 3PM

I’m going to be participating in a directed reading this Fall on psychoanalysis and (ostensibly) theology. With some help from Adam and others, this is the reading list that we have put together so far. The texts may get modified as we go along, but... [blog posts]

July 29, 3PM

I usually try to ignore things like political opinion polls, but the latest congressional approval ratings were all over Twitter. Apparently 83% of Americans disapprove of the job being done by Congress. If we begin with the assumption that consensus mean... [blog posts] [politics of the absurd]

July 27, 6AM

I wrote this paper, The Body Indebted or Glorious, which riffs on two essays from Agamben’s collection Nudities, trying to weave in some reflections on debt. Though it didn’t really come together like I wanted for various reasons, I thought ... [blog posts] [Agamben] [debt] [theology]

June 21, 1PM

This is a follow-up to The first job creator. And God spake all these words, saying, I am the Market thy God, which have brought thy GDP above the other nations, out of the bondage of reference to the flourishing of life. Thou shalt have no other gods be... [Economics] [Hebrew Scripture] [neoliberalism]

8AM

Brandy (who also contributes to this blog) argues that white straight men have been missing the point (lately): What might it mean to speak such boldness in our various communities? What might it mean to embody a joined boldness, born of intimacy? Does th... [feminism] [link posts]

May 30, 8AM

In Amaryah Armstrong’s recent post at Women in Theology she points to a talk by Frank Wilderson that compares the approaches to slavery in Django Unchained and Manderlay. Wilderson argues that “My goal [was] to raise the level of abstraction f... [Django Unchained] [film] [Inglourious Basterds]